CHEMICAL SPILL NOTIFICATION: None at this time

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Frequently Asked Questions:

 

 

How do I sign up for water service?

Setting up water service with the Wheeling Water Department can be done by completing the contract application which can be picked up in our office or downloaded from this website.  Bring the completed application along with 2 forms of identification (preferably one being a picture I.D.) and a $100.00 deposit to our office in the City/county Building at 1500 Chapline St, Room 112, Wheeling, WV.

 

I am moving, how do I disconnect my water service?

Water service can be disconnected by filling out the disconnect form found on this website or obtained in our office and mailing, faxing (304-234-3837), emailing (susied@wheelingwater.com) or delivering the form to our office in the City/County Building at Wheeling Water Department, 1500 Chapline St, Room 112, Wheeling, WV.  Remember, you are responsible for any water that passes through the meter while service is in your name.  Disconnecting the service when you move will prevent future residents of the premise from using water billed to you.

 

My water bill/consumption has gone up, why?

Start checking around the house for leaks, including dripping faucets, both inside and outside the premise, running toilets, leaking hot water tanks, leaking hoses on washing machines, water softeners, the hose on the back of the fridge to an ice maker, and/or anything that uses water.  If you water a garden or your lawn, wash cars or pressure wash these things can all make your consumption go up. Extra individuals in your home can also attribute to an increase. If you want to check for a leaking toilet we have dye packets available in our office, or you can use a few drops of food coloring in the tank, don’t flush and leave it for a period of time, then check to see if any of the color has leaked into the bowl.  If you suspect you have an underground leak, call the office (304 -234-3762) and we can help you determine that.  If our meter readers find abnormally high consumption they will leave a blue card for you, or if there is no place to leave one, we will send it in the mail to you.

 

My water was shut off for nonpayment, what do I have to do to get it back on?

To re-establish service after a cutoff for nonpayment, the minimum amount due plus a $25.00 reconnect fee must be paid before service will be restored.  The service will be restored within 24 hours after payment is received. This is in accordance with the West Virginia Public Service Commission Rules and Regulations.

 

What causes the grayish-black ring in the toilet bowl?

The grayish-black buildup is the result of fungal growth. In many cases this growth is composed of several fungi and other organisms. The source of the fungi is airborne fungal spores. These microscopic spores can be dispersed throughout the home by air currents. The water in the toilet is open to the environment and rapidly loses its chlorine residual. The internal area up under the lip of the toilet provides a refuge for the fungus. It is from here that the bowl is re-inoculated after cleaning. In most cases, growth reappears within several days after cleaning.

The bowl and tank must be disinfected after cleaning by adding bleach. The bleach must be allowed to sit for at least one-half hour. This procedure may be repeated several times. It is important that all areas with fungal growth be treated at the same time to eliminate cross contamination.

The presence of fungi in the toilet bowl should not be interpreted as a problem with the drinking water quality. It is very similar to leaving a piece of moist bread on the kitchen counter, sooner or later it will support mold growth. This does not mean the bread was bad, only that when it was left open to the environment it will support growth.

  

Why does my drinking water look cloudy sometimes?

Once in a while, you get a glass of water and it looks cloudy; maybe milky is a better term. After a few seconds it miraculously clears up! The cloudiness might be caused by the water pipes being under a bit more pressure than the water in the glass, but is more likely due to tiny air bubbles in the water. Like any bubble, the air rises to the top of the water and goes into the air above, clearing up the water. Cloudy water, also known as white water, is caused by air bubbles in the water. It is completely harmeless.

It usually happens when it is very cold outside because the solubility of air in water increases as water pressure increases and/or water temperature decreases. Cold water holds more air than warm water. In the winter, water travels from the reservoir which is very cold and warms up during its travel to your tap. Some of the air that is present is no longer soluble, and comes out of solution.

Also, water pressure has something to do with it. The water in the pipes is pressurized to a drgree (which helps to get the water all the way from the water tower to your home). Water under pressure holds more air than water that is not pressurized. Once the water comes out of your tap, the water is no longer under pressure and the air comes out of solution as bubbles (similar to carbonated soft drink). The best thing to do is let it sit in an open container until the bubbles naturally disappear. For more information http://water.usgs.gov/edu/qa-chemical-cloud.html

 

Do you have any information about lead in drinking water?

Lead info pamphlet.